ohsoromanov:

Outskirts of Moscow, 1974. (x)

"With that strange knowing that comes over me, like a clairvoyance, I know that I am sure of myself and my enormous and alarmingly timeless love for you; which will always be."

Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath  (via petrichour)

For my Muse —Nobody

(via journalofanobody)

mpdrolet:

First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy at Taj Mahal,March, 1962
Cecil William Stoughton

mpdrolet:

First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy at Taj Mahal,March, 1962

Cecil William Stoughton

"The avoidant student thinks she has nothing to write about because no one is more boring and dull than she. She writes poems with flat language to mirror her supposedly flat subjects. In extreme cases, she may retreat into fantasy, writing genre-inspired poems populated by vampires or zombies, or simply stall out and refuse to write entirely. Then there’s the student who believes his life is endlessly fascinating. He presents a magnum opus on the subject of his recent breakup. Often this student’s work is so personally coded that it is entirely opaque to readers. In a workshop setting, such poems can be frustrating for everyone involved. To greet these efforts by simply reiterating “write what you know” will seem futile and tone-deaf to these students. They believed, they tried, and it didn’t work. But what is the alternative? Rather than preaching “write what you know,” consider persona poetry. It seems paradoxical, but writing as someone else—exploring what you don’t know—can prove an excellent method of coming to know yourself as a writer. Using a persona allows a student to temporarily shake loose her devotion to portraying her “true” self and be someone else for a while."

Teaching the Persona Poem by Rebecca Hazelton

This article offers a solid basic overview of persona poems and addresses the same problem I have tried to identify here.

Don’t write about yourself. Embrace artifice. Release the shackles of ego and self-awareness.

(via uutpoetry)

"She was afraid of these things that made her suddenly wonder who she was, and what she was going to be in the world, and why she was standing at that minute, seeing a light, or listening, or staring up into the sky: alone."
Carson McCullers (via creatingaquietmind)
"Growing up, I didn’t read novels by women. It’s not that I didn’t want to. It’s almost like I didn’t think that I needed to or, I guess, I didn’t know that I needed to. I was perfectly happy in a world contained by men. I adopted the posture of the brooding male as my own. I was Salinger, I was Kerouac, I was any male protagonist in a novel that one of my boyfriends recommended. I didn’t know that there was a specific female sadness so I was content with relating to a generalized one. And in a way, reading these novels was less of a way to relate and more of a way to learn how to be the type of girl that these male novelists liked. One of my first ambitions wasn’t to be a writer – it was to be a writer’s muse."
Gabby Bess, in Dazed (via electric-cereal)
breadquilt:

Louise Bourgeois

breadquilt:

Louise Bourgeois